Volunteer

Taking over the World…

…one blog post at a time!

Today the GGAT offices are the scene of social media training for both staff and volunteers alike, learning how to promote the work of the Trust and its volunteer projects (such as the Gower Landscape Project and Access to Archaeology) through the wonderfully versatile medium of social media!

Volunteer adding information onto the computer system

From Forests to Firing Range

GGAT are currently looking for volunteers to help with a project on the north Gower coast.

The project will be focusing on two primary targets that were identified by the Arfordir project  as needing further work.  These being:

the Burry Inlet Artillery Range

the prehistoric forest and peat levels at Whitford Point.

If you’d like to be involved in this project or would like more information, please contact Paul W Huckfield outreach@ggat.org.uk or call 01792 655208 (ext 3).

Gower Landscape Partnership-Archaeological Training Workshop

Come along to the first ‘Finding Our History’ training session – Landscape Detective

Understand how maps are used in archaeology and historic landscape studies. Have a go at interpretation of cartographic information and Map Regression. Learn all about the Historic Environment Record, discover the new ARCHWILIO App and much more!

Ever wanted to try your hand at geophysical survey?

Ever wanted to try your hand at geophysical survey or learn how a survey is undertaken? 
 GGAT will be undertaking a geophysical survey at the Paviland and Knave Iron Age promontory forts on Gower.

GGAT Project staff, Rowena Hart and Charley James-Martin along with our Arfordir Co-ordinator, Paul Huckfield will be at the Knave on 30th April and at Paviland on the 8th May from 10.30am until 4pm.

Parking will be available at the National Trust Offices at:
SOUTH PILTON GREEN FARM, RHOSSILI, SA3 1PQ.

Secrets of Swansea’s prehistoric past unearthed.

More secrets of Swansea’s prehistoric past have come to light on the foreshore at Oystermouth Bay. Archaeologists from the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust along with local volunteers taking part in the Arfordir Coastal project, have been carrying out emergency recording of the remains of wooden trackways exposed by the bays shifting sands.

 GGAT archaeologist Ellie Graham stated that these remains are possibly that of an early Bronze Age trackway, similar to that excavated by the Trust in March 2009, and may well be an additional stretch of it. Learn more about the previous excavation.

The trackway crossed a very different landscape from that which we see today, as the climate during the early Bronze Age was much drier and warmer and the sea level significantly lower. Pollen analysis from the previous excavation showed that the trackway was probably built through a wet, marshy environment.

The race to record as much as possible of the site before its destruction by tidal action continues until the 27th February when the project comes to an end.

Two groups of local Volunteers working on the sections of trackway discovered on the foreshoreA GGAT archaeologist cleans a section of exposed wooden trackway with a trowel

Ellie Graham, Arfordir Co-ordinator gently cleans a section of the exposed trackway