Neath

Hands on Heritage at Neath Abbey

Neath Abbey poster

The impressive remains at Neath Abbey will once again resonate to the sounds of medieval life this coming Saturday 19th July, as Cadw’s  annual Hands on Heritage event makes it’s welcome return to the site.

Showcasing a range of heritage skills, the event will bring the medieval period alive with sounds and smells and offers the chance for people to experience and explore a range of heritage crafts from stone masonry to wool-spinning and basket weaving, all set within this spectacular location.

Experts will be  on hand to demonstrate skills stretching back to the Cisterian period in Wales, while visitors will be able to have a go at some themselves, thanks to hands-on activities.

There will also be  activities for youngsters  to get involved with too – from building a wattle-and-daub hurdle, making a medieval tile or stained glass panel to having a go at our mystery excavation activity!

Hands-On-Heritage Day at Neath Abbey

This coming Saturday is the ‘Hands-On-Heritage’ day at Neath Abbey.
There will be lots of activities going on for all the family, so why come along! 
Why you’re there pop over to the GGAT tent and say ‘hello’ and learn all about our current community survey project and see some of the results. For more information on the survey project visit the Neath Abbey Project blog.

Hands on Heritage Poster

Hands on Heritage program of events

GGAT return to the Roman fort at Neath

A GGAT archaeologist excavating the new narrow strip around the new school building

Just when we thought it was all over GGAT have had to return to the Roman fort at Neath in order to extend the excavated area. It was discovered that the size of the building footprint as originally calculated proved inadequate for the new teaching block at Dwr-y-felin school. Although we only excavated a narrow strip around last year’s area, it provided us with lots of new information.

GGAT archaeologist cleaning the stonework revetting of the forts defensive bank

On one side of the new building, we have been able to see that the original clay structure of the rampart had been removed over the stone toe at the front to be replaced by a timber revetment made from two-inch planks. At the back of the rampart, the new revetment was formed from blocks of turf that had been stepped back so that the rampart was widest at the base. The new part of the via sagularis to be revealed had had pits dug into it. On the other side of the new building the new work revealed a T-junction, where the via sagularis, which here had drains on both sides, was joined by another road, which had the beam slots for timber buildings on either side. These probably represent the barrack blocks of the earliest fort.

Newly excavated part of the via sagularis (road the runs around the inside of the fort)

 

New Roman discoveries in the offing

My name is Martin Tuck, a Project Officer with GGAT. My role alternates between fieldwork and  office based report writing.

At the moment I am engaged on the preparation of an archaeological excavation design, including Scheduled Monument Consent from Cadw, for additional work relating to the site of a Roman fort in Neath, where the Trust carried out an archaeological excavation during 2010, which continued through to the early part of 2011.

The  Roman remains discovered related to a 1st century Roman fort, which included defensive ditches and associated rampart, cooking areas and an internal circuit road.  The forthcoming works are likely to reveal details of part of the barracks.

Neath Abbey Medieval Day

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If your out and about in the Neath today why not visit us at Neath Abbey. GGAT are attending the Cadw event in the Abbey grounds. We’ve got our children’s excavation, try your hand at wattle ‘n’ daubing or search the Trust’s records using Archwilo. There’s guided walks, talks and medieval reinactors galore!! Also, the crepes are fantastic!